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b2ap3_thumbnail_shutterstock_300476897.jpgImigrants will often establish lives in the United States alongside their family members, and they may maintain steady employment, pay taxes, and build ties to their communities. After living in the U.S. for multiple years, potential deportation may completely upend a person’s life and cause a great deal of difficulty for them and their families. Fortunately, immigrants may have multiple options in these situations, and in some cases, a person may qualify for cancellation of removal, which will allow them to receive an adjustment of status and become lawful permanent residents.

Eligibility for Cancellation of Removal

Deportation is also known as removal. Those who qualify for cancellation of removal will be able to avoid being deported, and their legal status may be adjusted to lawful permanent resident, allowing them to receive a Green Card. Those who currently have a valid green card but are involved in deportation proceedings due to deportability or inadmissibility may receive a cancellation of removal if they have been a lawful permanent resident for at least five years, have lived in the United States for at least seven years, and have not been convicted of an aggravated felony.

Immigrants who are facing deportation and who do not have a Green Card may also be able to qualify for cancellation of removal, although they may need to meet additional requirements. They must have been living in the United States for at least 10 years, and they must have good moral character. They will also need to show that their deportation would cause unusual and exceptional hardship for one or more immediate family members (including their spouse, children, or parents) who are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents.

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ivirng immigration lawyerImmigrants in the United States who are undocumented or who need to defend against deportation may have a variety of options. For those who have experienced abuse, been the victims of crime, or are at risk of harm in other countries, humanitarian relief may be available. Minors who have experienced abuse or neglect may qualify for Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) status, which will allow them to remain in the United States and apply for green cards. When petitioning for this form of relief, a person will need to understand the eligibility requirements and the steps they will need to take to maintain a lawful status in the U.S.

Eligibility for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

If a person receives Special Immigrant Juvenile status, they will be able to apply to become a lawful permanent resident. SIJ status will provide exemptions to certain issues that may cause a person to be ineligible for adjustment of status, including unlawful entry and employment without authorization. If necessary, a person may also apply for a waiver of inadmissibility for any other issues that would be barriers to adjustment. After receiving SIJ status, a person will be able to apply for work authorization that will allow them to obtain employment while they are applying for a green card.

To qualify for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, a person must be under the age of 21 at the time they file their petition, and they must currently be living in the U.S. They must also be unmarried, and if they were previously married, the marriage must have ended through divorce, annulment, or the death of the other spouse. However, the most important requirement involves showing that the person has been the victim of abuse or neglect by a parent that has required them to receive protection from a juvenile court in the state where they live.

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Asylum Seekers Must Wait In Mexico Once Agai

The Biden Administration recently announced that it will restore a Trump-era policy regarding migrants waiting for immigration hearings. Any migrants who wish to enter the U.S. seeking asylum will once again need to stay in Mexico until the date of their hearing arrives.

According to NPR, Mexico will allow asylum seekers to return to the country to await their hearing dates. The revival of this policy will affect approximately 70,000 people seeking asylum in the U.S.

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New Rule Changes Requirements For Immigrants Fleeing Violence

Many immigrants flee their home countries due to violent and dangerous situations that put them and their families at risk. Recently, the U.S. changed its policies and ended requirements that made it harder for immigrants to come to the U.S. seeking asylum from violence.

According to AP News, Attorney General Merrick Garland provided updated instructions for immigration judges to use when making decisions about asylum grants for immigrants fleeing domestic or gang violence. This action undid rules from the Trump administration that made it harder for immigrants to qualify for asylum.

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Marriage Fraud

Individuals facing the immigration process generally live with a certain level of fear and uncertainty until everything is resolved. With paperwork errors, missed deadlines or allegations of fraud all potentially resulting in removal proceedings, the couple is usually met with an unending sense of unease until the matter is finalized.

Even couples who have done nothing wrong might feel the pressure of proving their relationship is legitimate. Marriage fraud is a common issue that could prevent a foreign spouse from obtaining a green card. The United States government is always on high alert for relationships that were created for the main purpose of evading immigration laws. Marriage fraud often has devastating consequences including deportation and jail time.

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